Active substance Celexocib
US Brand Celebrex
IN Brand Cobix
Manufacturing by Cipla
Strength 200mg
Form release Blister 10 capsules
Shipping time 7 – 18 days (Depending from the Country)
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DescriptionDosageSide EffectsPhotos
Celecoxib is a COX-2 selective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It is used to treat the pain and inflammation of osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, acute pain in adults, painful menstruation, and juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in people two years or older.

Celecoxib is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). It works by reducing hormones that cause inflammation and pain in the body.

Celecoxib is used to treat pain or inflammation caused by many conditions such as arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and menstrual pain.

Celecoxib is used to treat juvenile rheumatoid arthritis in children who are at least 2 years old. It is also used in the treatment of hereditary polyps in the colon.

Celebrex was one of Pfizer’s “best-selling drugs, amounting to more than $2.5 billion in sales [by 2012], and was prescribed to 2.4 million” people in 2011. By 2012, 33 million Americans had taken Celebrex. As of 2015, the cost for a typical month of medication in the United States is more than $200.

Usual Adult Dose for Pain

Day 1: 400 mg orally once followed by an additional 200 mg orally if needed
Usual dose: 200 mg orally twice a day as needed

Comment: The lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with individual patient treatment goals should be used.

Use: For the management of acute pain.

Usual Adult Dose for Dysmenorrhea

Day 1: 400 mg orally once followed by an additional 200 mg orally if needed
Usual dose: 200 mg orally twice a day as needed

Comment: Use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with individual patient treatment goals.

Use: For the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea.

Usual Adult Dose for Osteoarthritis

Usual dose: 200 mg orally once a day OR 100 mg orally twice a day

Comment: Use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with individual patient treatment goals.

Use: For the relief of the signs and symptoms of osteoarthritis.

Usual Adult Dose for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Usual dose: 100 or 200 mg orally twice a day

Comment: Use the lowest effective dose for the shortest duration consistent with individual patient treatment goals.

Use: For the relief of the signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

Usual Adult Dose for Ankylosing Spondylitis

Usual dose: 200 mg orally once a day OR 100 mg orally twice a day
-If no effect after 6 weeks, consider increasing dose to 400 mg orally daily
Maximum dose: 400 mg per day

Very common: may affect more than 1 in 10 people:

  • High blood pressure, including worsening of existing high blood pressure*

Common: may affect up to 1 in 10 people:

  • Heart attack*
  • Fluid build-up with swollen ankles, legs and/or hands
  • Urinary infections
  • Shortness of breath*, sinusitis (sinus inflammation, sinus infection, blocked or painful sinuses), blocked or runny nose, sore throat, coughs, colds, flu-like symptoms
  • Dizziness, difficulty sleeping
  • Vomiting*, stomach ache, diarrhoea, indigestion, wind
  • Rash, itching
  • Muscle stiffness
  • Difficulty swallowing*
  • Headache
  • Nausea (feeling sick)
  • Painful joints
  • Worsening of existing allergies
  • Accidental injury

Uncommon: may affect up to 1 in 100 people:

  • Stroke*
  • Heart failure, palpitations (awareness of heart beat), fast heart rate
  • Abnormal liver function, abnormalities in liver-related blood tests
  • Abnormalities in kidney-related blood tests
  • Anaemia (changes in red blood cells that can cause fatigue and breathlessness)
  • Anxiety, depression, tiredness, drowsiness, tingling sensations (pins and needles)
  • High levels of potassium in blood test results (can cause nausea (feeling sick), fatigue, muscle weakness or palpitations)
  • Impaired or blurred vision, ringing in the ears, mouth pain and sores, difficulty hearing*
  • Constipation, burping, stomach inflammation (indigestion, stomach ache or vomiting), worsening of inflammation of the stomach or intestine
  • Leg cramps
  • Raised itchy rash (hives)
  • Eye inflammation
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Skin discolouration (bruising)
  • Chest pain (generalised pain not relating to the heart)
  • Face oedema

Rare: may affect up to 1 in 1,000 people:

  • Ulcers (bleeding) in the stomach, gullet or intestines; or rupture of the intestine (can cause stomach ache, fever, nausea, vomiting, intestinal blockage), dark or black stools, inflammation of the pancreas (can lead to stomach pain), inflammation of the gullet (oesophagus)
  • Low levels of sodium in the blood (a condition known as hyponatraemia)
  • Reduced number of white blood cells (which help protect the body from infection) and blood platelets (increased chance of bleeding or bruising)
  • Difficulty coordinating muscular movements
  • Feeling confused, changes in the way things taste
  • Increased sensitivity to light
  • Loss of hair
  • Hallucinations
  • Bleeding in the eye
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Flushing
  • Blood clot in the blood vessels in the lungs. Symptoms may include sudden breathlessness, sharp pains when you breathe or collapse
  • Bleeding of the stomach or intestines (can lead to bloody stools or vomiting), inflammation of the intestine or colon
  • Severe liver inflammation (hepatitis). Symptoms may include nausea (feeling sick), diarrhoea, jaundice (yellow discolouration of the skin or eyes), dark urine, pale stools, bleeding easily, itching or chills
  • Acute kidney failure
  • Menstrual disturbances
  • Swelling of the face, lips, mouth, tongue or throat, or difficulty swallowing

Very rare: may affect up to 1 in 10,000 people

  • Serious allergic reactions (including potentially fatal anaphylactic shock)
  • Serious skin conditions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome, exfoliative dermatitis, toxic epidermal necrolysis, erythema multiforme and bullous eruption (can cause rash, blistering or peeling of the skin) and acute generalised exanthematous pustulosis (symptoms include the skin becoming red with swollen areas covered in numerous small pustules)
  • A delayed allergic reaction with possible symptoms such as rash, swelling of the face, fever, swollen glands, and abnormal test results (e.g. liver, blood cell (eosinophilia, a type of raised white blood cell count))
  • Bleeding within the brain causing death
  • Meningitis (inflammation of the membrane around the brain and spinal cord)
  • Liver failure, liver damage and severe liver inflammation (fulminant hepatitis) (sometimes fatal or requiring liver transplant). Symptoms may include nausea (feeling sick), diarrhoea, jaundice (yellow discolouration of the skin or eyes), dark urine, pale stools, bleeding easily, itching or chills
  • Liver problems (such as cholestasis and cholestatic hepatitis, which may be accompanied by symptoms such as discoloured stools, nausea and yellowing of the skin or eyes)
  • Inflammation of the kidneys and other kidney problems (such as nephrotic syndrome and minimal change disease, which may be accompanied by symptoms such as water retention (oedema), foamy urine, fatigue and a loss of appetite)
  • Worsening of epilepsy (possible more frequent and/or severe seizures)
  • Blockage of an artery or vein in the eye leading to partial or complete loss of vision
  • Inflamed blood vessels (can cause fever, aches, purple blotches on the skin)
  • A reduction in the number of red and white blood cells and platelets (may cause tiredness, easy bruising, frequent nose bleeds and increased risk of infections)
  • Muscle pain and weakness
  • Impaired sense of smell
  • Impaired sense of taste