Active substance Bortezomib
US Brand Velcade
IN Brand Bortenat
Manufacturing by India Natco
Strength 2mg, 3.5mg
Form release Vial Liophilized powder
Estimated shipping time 7 – 18 days (Depending from the Country)
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Bortezomib (BAN, INN and USAN; marketed as Velcade by Millennium Pharmaceuticals; Neomib by Getwell and Bortecad by Cadila Healthcare) is an anti-cancer drug and the first therapeutic proteasome inhibitor to be used in humans. Proteasomes are cellular complexes that break down proteins. In some cancers, the proteins that normally kill cancer cells are broken down too quickly. Bortezomib interrupts this process and lets those proteins kill the cancer cells. It is approved in the U.S. and Europe for treating relapsed multiple myeloma and mantle cell lymphoma. In multiple myeloma, complete clinical responses have been obtained in patients with otherwise refractory or rapidly advancing disease.

Bortezomib is an antineoplastic (cancer chemotherapy) medicine. It works by blocking certain proteins within the cancer cell, causing the cell to die. This helps to slow the growth and spread of the cancer.

DOSAGE IN PREVIOUSLY UNTREATED MANTLE CELL LYMPHOMA:
1.3 mg/m2 as a bolus IV injection twice weekly in combination with IV rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and oral prednisone for two weeks (days 1, 4, 8, and 11) followed by a ten day rest period (days 12 through 21)

Comments:
-The three week period is considered a treatment cycle.
-A minimum of 72 hours should elapse between consecutive doses of bortezomib.
-For patients with a response first documented at cycle 6, two additional cycles (for a total of 8 cycles) are recommended.

FOR USE IN THE TREATMENT OF RELAPSED MANTLE CELL LYMPHOMA:
-Usual dose: 1.3 mg/m2 as a bolus IV injection or subcutaneously twice weekly for two weeks (days 1, 4, 8, and 11) followed by a ten day rest period (days 12 through 21). Therapy extending beyond 8 cycles may be administered by the standard schedule or may be given once weekly for 4 weeks (days 1, 8, 15, and 22), followed by a 13-day rest (days 23 through 35).

Uses: For the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma

FOR USE IN THE TREATMENT OF PREVIOUSLY UNTREATED MULTIPLE MYELOMA:
-Usual dose: 1.3 mg/m2 administered as a 3 to 5 second bolus IV injection or subcutaneously in combination with oral melphalan and oral prednisone for nine 6-week treatment cycles:
-In cycles 1 through 4, bortezomib is administered twice weekly (days 1, 4, 8, 11, 22, 25, 29, and 32). In cycles 5 through 9, bortezomib is administered once weekly (days 1, 8, 22, and 29).

Comments:
-At least 72 hours should elapse between consecutive doses of bortezomib.

FOR USE IN THE TREATMENT OF RELAPSED MULTIPLE MYELOMA:
-Usual dose: 1.3 mg/m2 as a bolus intravenous injection or subcutaneously twice weekly for two weeks (days 1, 4, 8, and 11) followed by a ten day rest period (days 12 through 21). Therapy extending beyond 8 cycles may be administered by the standard schedule or may be given once weekly for 4 weeks (days 1, 8, 15, and 22), followed by a 13-day rest (days 23 through 35).

Comments:
-Bortezomib may be administered alone or in combination with dexamethasone.
-The three week period is considered a treatment cycle.
-A minimum of 72 hours should elapse between consecutive doses of bortezomib.
-Patients with multiple myeloma who have previously responded to treatment with bortezomib (either alone or in combination) and who have relapsed at least 6 months after their prior therapy may be started on the last tolerated dose.

Use: For the treatment of multiple myeloma (who had previously responded to treatment with this drug and who have relapsed at least 6 months after completing treatment)

Bortezomib is associated with peripheral neuropathy in 30% of patients; occasionally, it can be painful. This can be worse in patients with pre-existing neuropathy. In addition, myelosuppression causing neutropenia and thrombocytopenia can also occur and be dose-limiting. However, these side effects are usually mild relative to bone marrow transplantation and other treatment options for patients with advanced disease. Bortezomib is associated with a high rate of shingles, although prophylactic acyclovir can reduce the risk of this. Acute interstitial nephritis has also been reported.

Gastro-intestinal (GI) effects and asthenia are the most common adverse events.